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  #1  
Old 24th February 2011, 11:57 PM
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pachyrhinosaurus pachyrhinosaurus is offline
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Default HUGE pet problem

The story goes like this: I bought an exo-terra nano terrarium (http://exo-terra.com/en/products/nat...arium_nano.php) Then, I bought a plant, cocoanut shavings, and a dish. I am planning on getting a fog machine. There is just one problem. It will not fit into the dish I am using. The only other dish that is usable is too big to even think about fitting into the terrarium. (http://exo-terra.com/en/products/water_dish.php) I did not buy this fog machine yet, but it says that it works in 2 inches of water.
An alternate idea is for me to spray it with a spray bottle every day. I am not home every day, though. What should I do?
The only thing that I can think of is to buy a bigger tank. They cost up to a hundred dollars.
I also have no clue as to what lights to use. Any help, please? Oh, and my pet will be a red-eyed tree frog.
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Old 28th February 2011, 12:25 AM
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Problem solved. I am going to buy a bigger tank.
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Old 28th February 2011, 04:10 AM
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Be careful, red eye tree frogs need to be kept dry for most of the year, a constant humidifier will end up causing a fungus infection on the frogs. Even though the frogs are tropical (tropical is defined by temperatures not percentage of humidity) the conditions in an enclosed aquarium cause stagnation of the air and the frogs become prone to infections very easy. I have kept and bred this frog for years and the best way to keep them is in a dry terrarium with a water bowl and potting soil or gravel with plants that are kept in pots and watered every other day or even artificial plants. a light misting with a spray bottle once a day is more then enough to keep them healthy. As for lighting the frogs are strongly nocturnal so there is no need for a special light.

This is only the first reason they are not good pets, when you go to the pet store, you usually see them closed up and on the glass or under leaves in a display tank. It isn't until the store clerk picks one up or disturbs it that you see the colors of the flanks and the bright red eyes. It is also very important for that same reason that you feed the frogs at night, they will not feed while lights are on in the aquarium. Most of the time they are so sensitive to light that they usually don't even awake if there are room lights on.

Another strike against them is they should not be handled, the skin of most frogs is very sensitive to damage when touched by human hands. Our hands are oily and the frogs skin is wet, water and oil do not mix and if the mucus that covers the frogs skin is removed by your fingers the frog becomes suceptable to bacteria. Handling them also stresses them out to where they sometimes go off food.

Finally the terrarium needs to be kept clean, a hard thing to do in a decorated aquarium, letting the waste of the frogs and dead food items in the tank will also allow fungus to grow in the potting soil and as the frogs move around at night will cause both bacterial and fungal infections. Most of these frogs are wild caught, and only some collection locations have the really bright blue and yellow flanks. If you buy them and they are not colorful it is because they were collected from locations where the population has less color and they will never brighten up.

If you wish to breed them you need to do several things. First is to have at least 4 individuals, 1 female and 3 males. Red eye males will not breed unless they have competition from other males for the female. Females are 3 times as big as a male so it is easy to sex adults, the males are the small ones. This is the only way to sex them, color is the same depending on where they came from and babies are brown and don't show size until they are sexually mature. They breed on leaves above the water, laying the egg mass on the underside of large leaves above a pool of water. They also need nightly thunderstorms and rain to stimulate breeding. Here is what I did when I bred them. I did this outdoors in the summer when the weather was warm and I took a kiddy wading pool like they sell in the stores at summer time. I put a screen cage in the pool, making sure there was at least 6 inches of water and about 2 feet above for the frogs. I put several large leaved potted plants in the water and each night I put a sprinkler over the pool for about 1/2 hour right at sunset so it was dark when I turned off the water. I sometimes also played one of those thunderstorm CD's sold at nature and spiritual shops, but most of the time it didn't make a difference if I played the thunder sounds or not. I fed the frogs lots of crickets, I tried to keep them in the cage at all times but be careful not to put too many because the crickets would chew through the screen of the cage. Every morning I would check the bottom of the leaves for the egg masses, if I found them I would cut the leaf off the plant and tape it onto the glass (above the water level) of a 20 gallon aquarium that was only 1/2 full with the lit tightly fit so the humidity in the fish tank was high at all times. When the tadpoles hatch they fall into the water section and I began feeding them crushed flake fish foods until most of the eggs were hatched. Then I moved them to 10 gallon tanks with sponge filters, any other filters usually sucked the tadpoles into them and killed them. Keep the water clean and as they get legs move them to a tank where they can get out of the water easily. As babies they can't climb the glass like the adults and they are not good swimmers so they easily drown if they can't just walk out the the water.

They are not the best pet frog to keep, but if you follow the guidelines and don't care if they sleep all the time when you watch them they will live for between 5 and 8 years. If you want something to watch in action, these are not the best pet and stress or conditions not to their liking can easily kill them.
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Old 28th February 2011, 09:13 PM
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Wow! thanks. ;) I plan on breeding them in the very far away future, but I still have questions about heating. I live in pennsylvania in the US. How do I heat the terrarium? Also, would these frogs mind a few Tillandsia ionantha plants in there. Mind what I said earlier, but the problem is unsolved
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Last edited by pachyrhinosaurus : 28th February 2011 at 09:13 PM. Reason: ttypo
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Old 1st March 2011, 12:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pachyrhinosaurus View Post
Wow! thanks. ;) I plan on breeding them in the very far away future, but I still have questions about heating. I live in pennsylvania in the US. How do I heat the terrarium? Also, would these frogs mind a few Tillandsia ionantha plants in there. Mind what I said earlier, but the problem is unsolved
I don't know this particular bromiliad but as far as I know they don't care about any plants as long as they are not toxic. The only thing to consider when planting the terrarium is make sure the plants like the same conditions as the frogs. To heat the tank they are in use the same type heat pads that most reptiles take and you should be fine.
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Old 1st March 2011, 12:47 AM
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So will Exo-terra Heatwaves work?
http://exo-terra.com/en/products/hea...rainforest.php
By the way, once I mastered this, I may move on to an Archispirostreptus gigas or a hissing cockroach or two.
I remind myself of Nigel Marven on Prehistoric Park, if you ever saw the show.
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Last edited by pachyrhinosaurus : 1st March 2011 at 12:49 AM. Reason: Add reason for editing, and to add information.
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Old 1st March 2011, 04:41 AM
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Thanks both of you for the interesting information.
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  #8  
Old 1st March 2011, 11:15 PM
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Another question, do you think that those ephibytes could live without the light, or do they need it? Thanks for answering my questions. It is always better to get information from the owners of red-eyed tree frogs than someone who only read about them. This problem may be just about solved soon.
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Old 2nd March 2011, 02:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pachyrhinosaurus View Post
Another question, do you think that those ephibytes could live without the light, or do they need it? Thanks for answering my questions. It is always better to get information from the owners of red-eyed tree frogs than someone who only read about them. This problem may be just about solved soon.
I am not a good person to ask about the plants, but I am pretty sure all plants need sunlight or a good substitute.

Hissing cockroaches are very easy to keep and breed, I have always kept and bred them as food for larger reptiles in my collection, and if you feed them a good quality food, give them room to move around and keep them warm they should be an easy to raise insect.

I am not familiar with the heatpad you asked about in the earlier post, but I would guess any good quality brand would be acceptable.
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  #10  
Old 2nd March 2011, 07:19 PM
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I'm not adding plants, after all. I am drawing a line between my plants and my animals. However, The school in my town has hissing cockroaches, I remember in seventh grade we got to hold them. Good memories
My local museum has live ones too. The only place that doesn't is the pet store. I shop from That Pet Place, which has a lot of animals. No Cockrroaches. But still, there are a lot of role models for me, including you. How big is your live animal collection, anyways?
We should switch to PM-ing each other, since the problem is now solved.
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Last edited by pachyrhinosaurus : 2nd March 2011 at 07:23 PM. Reason: Ask "How big is your live animal collection, anyways?"
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